About your Search

20130318
20130326
STATION
MSNBCW 10
CNNW 2
KQED (PBS) 2
SFGTV2 2
CSPAN 1
KGO (ABC) 1
LANGUAGE
English 20
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
francisco ans such as mary rodgers and howard thurman, danny glory, willie brown and now london breed who have given of themselves, that all people, black, white, yellow, brown and red might reach their full potential. almighty god, hear us as we lay our lives before you to be blessed. help us to know ourselves through godly introspection, that in seeing ourselves as you see us, we may more readily revise and correct our lives. we know that you have made us one and all in your image. and, so, we pray that we will mirror you as we live our day to day lives. we are broken people living in a broken world, and we need you to help us to cope and mend our brokenness. we pray for those who have been pushed into the zone of desperation. we pray for those with illnesses that medical science cannot cure. we pray for those in whom hate has become malignant and those in whom hope has died. bless our fair city and its leadership. bless our governor, and give strength to our president barack obama. this is our prayer in jesus' name, amen. >>> amen. (applause) >> lift every voice and sing till earth and
and punishments. jeffrey brown has our book conversation. >> brown: they begin as often grisly tales of murder, the stuff of the tabloids and nightly news, but some of these crime stories end up in the supreme court, part of a continuing and evolving debate in this country about the death penalty, its methods, its effectiveness, its morality. a new book explores this history. it's titled "murder at the supreme court: lethal crimes and landmark cases." its authors are veteran journalists martin clancy and tim o'brien. the title sounds like an agatha christie mystery but you're after something quite serious. why, martin, were you... why a book on murder, the law and a supreme court? >> because the crimes intrigued us. i mean, the cases legally are very interesting and tim can speak to that. but as reporters we were both intrigued by the stories behind those crimes. i mean there are human beings, victims, perpetrators, families. we take you literally from the scene of the crime to the court. >> brown: and the stories become law at a local level and then you're telling us about how they bubble up
. >> right. a new report from brown university says the total cost of the war in iraq has been $2.2 trillion. the cost can double or triple when you take interest payments into account. why is it that your republican colleagues don't ever talk about this when they talk about our debt? they never mention this tremendous part of that debt. >> one thing that was so frustrating to a lot of democrats who consider ourselves to be fiscally responsible is of course, you had the bush tax cuts. then right after, you had the attacks on september 11th and you had the war on afghanistan, which i supported and almost all of the members of congress did, because those were the people that attacked us. but then, you had the war in iraq and both afghanistan and iraq were fought as quote emergencies, which means they weren't included in the annual deficits. so, now, when they're talking about a budget that cuts student loan programs for gi members, people coming back from iraq and afghanistan now they're not getting their student loans. because this was all fought off budget. i think that's political malpracti
set the tone for a humbler, simpler church at his inaugural mass. jeffrey brown talks to john allen in rome. >> me where againing now the focus shifts from style to substance and the question becomes how is this new tone going to be translated into the hard work of actually governing the church? there, of course, the challenges are considerably more steep >> ifill: we continue our series of stories about the middle east, margaret warner reports on the divide among the two leading palestinian factions, and its impact on the quest for peace. . >> it is really a divide over power. who's going to control what and what's going to be in a stronger position to win the palestinian people and who's going to have the narrative on its side? >> woodruff: and we examine a dramatic shift in public opinion with a majority of americans supporting same sex marriage. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by:
in california governor jerry brown sold californians on a temporary tax increase for high income earners in his state. i guess the blue state liberals never learn. >> paul: bret? >> briefly a hit for pope francis off to a fantastic start and i think this is obviously true for catholics and even as a non-catholic you see a pope getting out and mingling with people and showing love and humility to the people assemblying by the hundreds of thousands in rome to see him. next week, he's going to go and wash the feet of inmates in a prison for young offenders and this is the right way it seems to me to conduct the papacy and wish him continued success. >> paul: thank you all. and remember, if you have your own hit or miss, send it to us at jer@foxnews.com and follow us on twitter: @jer on fnc. that's our show and thanks to all of you, i'm paul gigot and we hope to see you all here next week. >> on fox news watch. >> anything between me and my friend bb is a-- >> with the media in tow, president obama takes his show on the road. and convinces israelis and palestinians he really does care. is the pres
joins us later. campbell brown will be here and "the washington post" ezra klein. up next the top stories in the politico playbook. first, bill karins with a check on the forecast. >>> no good news and another snowstorm moving across the country. most likely sunday into monday. let me show you the stark contrast between this start of spring and last year. last year at this point the blue on the map and the purple show you where the snow was. no snow pretty much east of the ms river and through the midwest. only 20% of the country this time last year was covered in know. look at the map currently. 30% of the lower 48 covered by snow and we have snow pack from maine tlhrough the great lakes and upstate and wisconsin and minnesota. the winds coming down from canada over the snow, it just doesn't have a chance to moderate and warm up. look how cold it was yesterday. high temperatures in the 20s in the great lakes. we should be almost near mid-40s to near 50 this time of the year. this morning is very cold once again from fargo to minneapolis, chicago, just another bitterly cold day ou
disorder and more. according to a new report by brown university, 190,000 have been killed in iraq. 70% of them civilians. 4,488 of them u.s. service members. the war cost you, taxpayers, $2.2 trillion. the cost of rebuild iraq, $60 billion, although most of that money went to contractors and military police. the rest was lost to fraud. as far as making america safer, sadam was a cruel dictator and you could argue he was unstable. but saddam hussein had no weapons of mass destruction and no ties to al qaeda. the talkback question, what did we learn from the iraq war? facebook.com/carol cnn, or tweet me @carolcnn. >>> up next, the fiscal fight in washington is taking the toll. and the next casualty could be the easter bunny. political buzz is next. [ female announcer ] how do you define your moment? the blissful pause just before that rich sweetness touches your lips. the delightful discovery, the mid-sweetening realization that you have the house all to yourself. well, almost. the sweet reward, making a delicious choice that's also a smart choice. splenda no-calorie sweetener. with the
that have been ignored for years. in my case, it was a brown fill site where a lot of african-american families, 3 b300 families had been moved on to this site. it was a toxic dump. nobody had done anything about it. i started working hard -- >> you got government to fix it? >> i started working hard to get it relocated and once republicans and democrats in washington found out what happened, they worked on it and it was a pretty -- harold ford jr. the first time he met me on the floor what you're doing down in florida is land mark. what have you done and how did you get to it? i said i just went into the community. i didn't have to go vote for higher taxes or do these things that i was against idle lodeol y ideologically. >> what you did is called environmental justice. >> right. >> if you had gone to cpac and said words environmental justice, what sort of reception would you have gotten? it fi had gone to cpac and said you know what i did? i found 300 families that had been moved on top of a brown stone site, brown-filled site and their young children your reasoning around o
that we see. we see the browning of america. we see, you know, the gay rights movement is preceding at pace. you know, we saw the first female speaker of the house not too long ago. so it's this change that they have a problem dealing with, chris. and let me get to the point about -- >> why would somebody care -- i always wondered about this. why would somebody who is white care about whether the country is white 100 years from now? they're not going to be here. and the people here would be comfortable with it. your nature will change with the country's nature. it does sound like pure racism. if you want the country to be tribally white 100 years from now. i don't know why a black person would care either. why do people speculate the way they think what the country will be like in 100 years. i don't get that. what do you think? >> when we think about what the typical american is, this is shown throughout social science literature. the typical american type is a white male, protestant, straight, married. right? so when we think about any departure from this type is considered the oth
that is against affirmative action gets so hot and boder if anyone brown or black or woman. in positions, and black conservatives really understand, i think, in a very real way that they have a great opening in a party like that. alan west became an instant star. mr. herman cain became an instant star. at one point he was at the top of the list of people when you polled republicans. there's still people who want allan west to be president. ben carson has an added benefit. he hasn't been caught up in the republican party bad brand problems. a lot of people didn't even know he was a conservative. he also has a book to sell. he's going to sell a lot. >> you're being far to ironic and cynical. david, is it not possible that an individual like dr. ben carson could well, i don't know, become a potential presidential nominee? herman cain was in the running at one point. >> yes, i mean, herman cain makes him look like linking in a lot of ways in terms of political experience as well. he has a few, you know, down sides already. he's already said that he's opposed to medicare and medicaid. he'd li
. and most of them were in the black and brown commune pipts talking about access to books and the likes and access to computers and classroom sizes. i think we are paying for a misappropriatation on the war and tax cut. and schools struggle in chicago, detroit, on democracy, we are paying a big price for the misstep in iraq and afghanistan. >> yes, sir. dying today, at 82 years old, rest if peace, wrote a book, harkening back to william yates. is there still a chance the closings can be forstalled. >> first of all, this is an experiment. the hear shines, 54 schools, kids going across gang zones, we have lost last year nearly 600 of our youth were killed, whether high profile can killings within a fear of run across not known as gang zones. without urban policy that's defined, of drugs, guns, jobs end, home foreclosures. that is the devaluation after school tax base evaluation. the school, job, poverty, racial violence and fear. >> reverend jackson, is what is happening in chicago indicative of where we are setting priorities across the country? they seem to be awfully misled and don't s
votes. >> i know what they're doing. they know what they're doing. anybody of any color, white or brown or black ought to notice what it's about. it's about race. >> they don't understand, if they go in that direction, they're driving themselves further -- >> the whole message to minorities, we're trying to disenfranchise you. come up with a new literacy text -- >> they'll stick with rural areas where no people are. >> thank you, guys. thank you, howard. you're all right. thank you, joy. he's more vintage like me. you through sheer genius. it's caught up with us. >>> up next, first the truth, then the brave. how the people who were supposed to be the referees in the war going up to the war became its cheerleaders on the way. we'll be right back. we're talking iraq and how it happened. [ male announcer ] when it comes to the financial obstacles military families face, we understand. our financial advice is geared specifically to current and former military members and their families. life brings obstacles. usaa brings retirement advice. i work for 47 different companies. well, technicall
in movies, but thought it was fine that scott brown posed nude in a magazine? i have a different taste in nudity. >> i was against scott brown's nudes. hair-on-fire crazy, but the gift that keeps on getting. >> clint eastwood. >> oscar for the best political convention. >> i will not tackle a legend. i am not going to attack an 80- year-old legend. the guy has done great, great film, i am not going to attack him. i will not attack that. >> tea party. >> harry reid's best friend. thank you for saving the majority in the senate, tea partiers. >> understood. >> reagan. >> principles. >> principles and liberals. he was ahead of his time on gay rights. signed amnesty for undocumented workers. reagan was a liberal. >> president barack obama. >> greatest president of the 21st century. obvious. even you have to agree he was better than bush. >> i would say cold, remote, and deeply cynical. >> an easy one -- god >> present in the details. >> god is love. [applause] >> just by luck of the draw, you lead with satan. >> hate. >> the dark lord of good intentions. >> last one -- hugo chavez. >> sata
achievement. you get brown v board but you don't necessarily get desegregated schools. >> quite the opposite. >> right. the focus on the legal right, while totally understandable because equal rights under the law seems like a basic starting point for any kind of egalitarian politics. it's a piece. one of the things -- i think that the analogy made to abortion is quite instructive. the energy with ruth bader ginsburg this morning. one of the problems with the way abortion has evolved as an issue was that it was disarticulated from broader reproductive justice issues. so that abortion sort of became like a consumer right that an individual could purchase approximate she could afford it. >> yep. >> other people would lose the right because it wasn't understood as a matter of justice. it was understood as a kind of consumer right. with marriage, the same danger is there. that the legal right to access to marriage as it now exists is kind of the end point. even though we won't get there now, we'll get there eventually. rather than understanding that a broader way of recognizing household and par
exchange you had and the name charlie brown came up. >> oh, yeah. >> explain what happened. >> well, it was just a lighthearted thing. i mean, the president, as you know, has a great sense of humor, and i was saying he is going to be a savvy negotiator. that's the only point he was making. if you know sometimes with lucy pulling the ball up right when charlie would kick it, and then he'd fall for that trick over and over again. the president's point was, he will be a solid negotiator. he's going to keep the interest of the low-income in mind when he does negotiation. and we should trust he's doing all he can. and i do trust the president. i still have an obligation to raise up the interests of my constituents who are just totally skidding by in this tough economy. >> keith ellison, thank you very much for coming in. >> thank you. >> democratic congressman from minnesota. >>> up next, a surprise for president obama. what our latest poll shows about his job approval. >>> then, an insider from the bush white house is spilling the beans about the march to war in iraq ten years ago. the
him, sound like -- they call brown bears in siberia. here, kitty, kitty, kitty. a big old bear. >> those are bear bars. not to keep criminals out. they know what they're doing over there. >>> coming up, the breakfast that promises to boost your sex life. >> really? serve some up. >> and forget about siri on your iphone. a woman's talking head could replace her. better not hurt her feelings. i will show you why. you are watching "world news now." >> announcer: "world news now" weather brought to you by mucinex sinus max. sinus max. with hotwire's low prices, we can afford to take an extra trip this year. first boston... then san francisco. hotwire checks the competitions' rates every day so they can guarantee their low prices. so our hotels were half price. ♪ h-o-t-w-i-r-e... ♪ ♪ hotwire.com ♪ we know a place where tossing and turning have given way to sleeping. where sleepless nights yield to restful sleep and lunesta eszopiclone can help you get there like it has for so many people before. do not take lunesta if you are allergic to anything in it. when taking lu
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)